Friday, August 6, 2010

New 8 x 10 Work

I've gotten a little behind with editing some of my most recent 8 x 10 images. Here is what I have so far. Stay tuned for more in the coming weeks. Thanks

Spring wildflower bloom at sunrise over the Painted Hills, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon

Gowland Lite 8 x 10
Schneider Super Symmar 150
Lee .9 Soft Grad
40 sec @ F45
Fuji Provia 100F


Last light on the Painted Hills, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon

Gowland Lite 8 x 10
Schneider Super Symmar 150
Lee .6 Hard Grad
1.5 Sec @ F32
Fuji Provia 100F


Sunrise over the Steens, Basin and Range, Oregon, Spring 2010

I have never experienced sustained winds that packed as much force as they did on this trip. The skies turned brown with dust during the peak of the storm; dust devils danced across the playa; and the occasional squall, given away by the wall of dust hurtling towards me, rattled the sagebrush and emerging wildflowers. Camped 5 mi out on the Alvord, I was a bit surprised when the winds calmed to almost zero during the night. Taking advantage of the respite, I awoke early the next morning and made this image as first light touched the east face of the Steens.

Gowland 8 x 10
Schneider Super Symmar 150
Lee .6 Hard Grad
Provia 100F
24 Sec @ F64
Tango Drumscan


East Steens, Basin and Range, Oregon, Spring 2010

Resembling a cauldron, this chunk of weathered basalt has taken on its unique layered shape as a result of the endless cycle of freezing/thawing. Photographed at sunset as the last bit of light faded from the distant Sheepshead Mountains.

A series of emails were sent back and forth between a Geologist and a friend of mine in an attempt to find out the name of this basalt feature.

It goes like this:

Strange rock? Put here by aliens or? What is this feature called? Help! -Jim

Weathering feature? Not sure it has a name. Jon may have a fancy name for it. -Terry

Tyson's Rock explained by a geologist:

Jim,
It is Steens Basalt, it looks like a superimposed pahoehoe toe, the general outlines resemble thoes of pillows, but are distinguished from true pillows by their pronounced concentric structure and lesser development of glassy margins. From: Basalts-The Poldervaart Treatise on Rocks of Basaltic Composition Vol.1, pg.11
-Jon

Steens Basalt it is. I like Jim's explanation best ;) -Tyson

Gowland Lite 8 x 10
Schneider Super Symmar 150
Lee .9 Hard Grad
24 sec @ F64
Fuji Provia 100F
Tango Drumscan

Sunbow, Basin and Range, Oregon, Spring 2010

This meteorological phenomenon will always be one of my favorite subjects to witness and photograph. I cannot help but think of it as a magic portal into some kind of Astral Realm. This particular sunbow was so intense and so bright that I could feel its energy radiating downward. For two nights I camped high atop a mountain peak overlooking the Alvord Desert. This peak, a lonely isolated summit in Oregon's remote SE corner became a very special place for me during the spring of 2010. Over a 4 week period I watched it transition from winter to spring and, finally, summer. I watched the cactus flowers grow; I felt the sting of snow and sleet as it drifted across big open skies; and I observed the winter snowpack slowly fade from the precipitous eastern face of Steens Mountain. This spectacle of refracted sunlight took shape one afternoon, filling the entire sky as it brightened with intensity. Before the sunbow disappeared, double rings appeared around its outer fringes. Easily the most extraordinary example of a sunbow I had ever seen, I decided to capture it on my 8 x 10 camera. I had just enough time to expose one sheet of film before it dissolved into the afternoon sky. Artistically, my intention here was to deliberately underexpose the shot which I hoped would convey my interpretation of this otherworldly natural wonder.

Gowland Lite 8 x 10
Schneider Super Symmar 150
1/60th sec @ F64
Fuji Provia 100F
Tango Drumscan

Sunset over Haystack Rock, Oregon Coast, December 2009

If the conditions are just right, winter sunsets over the ocean can bring some of the best color of the year. During the record setting cold snap in December of 2009 I decided to head out to the coast to experience some of the unique conditions there. The seas were calm and the temps were well below freezing the entire time. I hiked out to the very end of Cape Kiwanda to a scenic spot where the wave sculpted sandstone drops off into the Pacific. The strong east winds the state was experiencing at the time kept the marine layer at bay while bringing in some high clouds from over the coast range. These clouds serendipitously settled right into place as the sun dropped below the horizon. This was my first attempt shooting the coast with my 8 x 10 setup.

Gowland Lite 8 x 10
Fujinon 250
2 Stop Grad
2 Sec @ F22

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